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END THE MISERY

STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING, SEXUAL & GENDER BASED VIOLENCE TODAY

Yearly, thousands of people are trafficked worldwide with their rights violated!
We cannot end this injustice alone. With your help, we can target the systems that make Human Trafficking possible. Together, we can save humanity.
Through our network, we shall prevent people from being trafficked into a life of potential slavery, sexual molestation and unjust hardship.
Everyone has the right to live a life free from violence and discrimination. Join our Global Partnership to end Human Trafficking and Sexual exploitation.
ROOST Foundation

We are a Non-Governmental Organisation with our Headquarters based in Abuja, Nigeria. Our activities shall cut across all borders and shores of every continent.

We are committed to preventing all forms of HUMAN TRAFFICKING, SEXUAL and GENDER BASED Violence through massive awareness campaigns, collaboration and cooperation between all relevant stake holders; to liberate and uplift the vulnerable, especially women and children in exploitative conditions through, massive awareness campaigns, access to justice, medical and humanitarian aid and to ensure their rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

Part of our objectives are itemised below:

To work for the social development of victims of Trafficking In Persons (TIP) and Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV) in Nigeria;
To participate and engage in public and community health programming.
To assist in the process of social integration and personal realisation of victims of TIP and SGBV.
To endorse the human rights and in particular the rights of victims of TIP and SGBV and promote gender equality.

ANA/ROOST FOUNDATION NATIONAL ESSAY CONTESTS

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSION

Can you write a short composition in prose that discusses the themes of “Sexual and Gender-Based Violence or Human Trafficking or Irregular Migration”?Can you write a short composition in prose that proposes an argument in any of those three themes, without claiming to be a complete or thorough exposition? The ASSOCIATION OF NIGERIAN AUTHORS and ROOST FOUNDATION have a total of N1,050,000 in prizes money, plus certificates, to share among first runners-up, second runners-up and winners for essays under the following three themes:

 

  1. Sexual and Gender-BasedViolence
  2. Human Trafficking
  3. Irregular Migration

 

TOPIC

You should find a fitting topic for your essay, which MUST be within the themes of: Sexual and Gender-Based Violence or Human Trafficking or Irregular Migration. We need informative and well researched essays on your chosen topics.

 

DEADLINES:

Submission opens on 12th June 2021 and closes on 31st July 2021.

Result announcement: 30th September 2021, via print media, electronic media, ANA National Forum Facebook Page and www.roostfoundation.org

 

SUBMIT VIA EMAIL TO:

essaysanaroost@gmail.com

 

ELIGIBILITY

Nigerians only. No age limit. No registration required. No fee is required.

 

IMPORTANT RULES

The essay should be in English (UK). MINIMUM 750 WORDS, and 1,000 words maximum. Word Format, with word count written at the top, together with topic/title.

Plagiarised essays will not be accepted for the contest.

Write your name, age, city, phone number, email, photo (optional) and topic/title of your entry in your letter forwarding your submission. DO NOT write these in your submitted essay.

Avoid writing “I” or personal experiences unless the topic is such that you are compelled to write your experience.

Attach the image of your Nigerian identity and any other image separately as jpg.

The decisions of judges are the FINAL and no queries related to results will be entertained.

Sending your essay to us gives us the authority to publish it from our side anywhere, online or in digital magazines. However, participants can tell in the very beginning that they are not interested in publishing the article anywhere.

 

JUDGEMENT CRITERIA

All the essays will be judged on the basis of your logic, survey, writing style, innovation, structure, etc: bring out all the details about your chosen topic. Write point-wise, with proper logic. Keep ideas simple. Copied entries would be rejected during the screening process: freely create your own structure by providing all the information about your topic without copying.

 

PRIZES

1st Prize –  N200,000 plus a certificate

2nd Prize – N100,000 plus a certificate

3rd Prize –  N50,000 plus a certificate

To be presented to winners during the 40th International Convention of ANA at the end of 2021.

 

QUERIES

Please feel free to contact us only through email at essay: essaysanaroost@gmail.com. Have patience after posting your queries. Your queries will be answered by one of our team members at the earliest to us.

 

 

SIGNED:

 

AKOGUN TAI OGUNTAYO

ANA GENERAL SECRETARY

 

AHMED MAIWADA.

ANA PRESIDENT

 

DAME JULIE OKAH-DONLI

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, ROOST FOUNDATION

SEXUAL AND GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

Sexual and gender based violence (SGBV) is any act of sexual, physical and domestic violence against anyone, male or female. Do not commit any violence act against any person!

HUMAN TRAFFICKING IS EVIL. STOP IT NOW

Do You Know that if you employ a child under 12 years as a domestic worker, if you treat any person as a slave, if you buy and sell human organs, organize foreign trips which promote prostitution of any person, it is trafficking?

FACT CHECK


72%

of identified trafficking victims are women and girls.

UNDODC 2018 Global Trafficking in Persons Report

94%

of detected sex trafficking victims are women and girls.

UNDODC 2018 Global Trafficking in Persons Report

1 in 3

women has experienced physical or sexual violence.

Global and regional estimates of violence against women, WHO 2013

Human trafficking occurs in every town, city and country in the world. the majority of its victims are women and girls.

Accept what’s done to their children, if you don’t mind it being done to yours.

We take a stand. We fight against all forms of Human Trafficking. PARTNER WITH US TODAY. Together, we can save humanity.

NEED HELP?

HAVE YOU BEEN OR YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO HAS BEEN TRAFFICKED BEFORE?
ARE YOU A VICTIM OF SEXUAL AND GENDER BASED VIOLENCE?
CALL OUR 24 HOUR HOTLINE

+234 (0) 907 034 3838

Stay Connected, Stay Informed. Join Our Mailing List!

Sign Up for News and Updates

WHAT IS HUMAN TRAFFICKING?
Human trafficking is the trade of humans for the purpose of forced labour, sexual slavery, or commercial sexual exploitation for the trafficker or others. This may encompass providing a spouse in the context of forced marriage, or the extraction of organs or tissues, including for surrogacy and ova removal. Human trafficking can occur within a country or trans-nationally.
Human trafficking is a crime against the person

 

...READ MORE
CAUSES OF HUMAN TRAFICKING
Human trafficking is a global, complex, and heartbreaking issue. For approximately 40 million people, it’s not some obscure, disconnected concept that’s hard to comprehend; it’s a reality they’re forced to live in daily.
If we want to effectively contribute to the eradication of modern slavery, we must first understand what causes it and how it affects those involved. Only then can we start making strategic moves to stop human trafficking and truly help those in need.

 

...READ MORE
EFFECTS OF HUMAN TRAFICKING
Human trafficking can have physical, emotional, and psychological effects on anyone involved. It has the power to impact someone’s life forever.
Here are some common ways human trafficking affects victims and perpetrators. As you read through this section, keep in mind that many traffickers also experience trauma because of what they see and do to others, and many traffickers have been victimized themselves at some point in their lives.

 

...READ MORE

What You Can Do To Help

Here at Roost Foundation, we believe we all have a role to play in creating a free world. Our organization focuses on working with local police to find and free modern slaves and arrest traffickers, but there are numerous ways YOU can help fight human trafficking in your own community.
a) Bring awareness to your social circles so your friends and family know more about trafficking.
b) Consider volunteering with a local counter-trafficking organization.
c) Donate money to an organization that works on the front lines.
d) Call the National Human Trafficking Hotline if you notice suspicious activity.
e) Be a friend to someone who’s alone and vulnerable.
No action is too small. Never underestimate the difference you can make in someone’s life through one small act of kindness.
Our Rehabilitation and Reintegration Process
Help Us Continue to Transform Lives
Roost Foundation Board of Trustees

DONATIONS

100% of Funds Contributed go to investigative, rescue and aftercare work on the front lines. Donations provide critical items such as investigative expenses, law enforcement support, medical bills and funds for social workers.

FUND DEPLOYMENT

Your funds are used to deploy operatives alongside local law enforcement and aftercare workers. These men and women work on the front lines to help rescue survivors and arrest traffickers.

Human trafficking is the trade of humans for the purpose of forced labour, sexual slavery, or commercial sexual exploitation for the trafficker or others. This may encompass providing a spouse in the context of forced marriage, or the extraction of organs or tissues, including for surrogacy and ova removal. Human trafficking can occur within a country or trans-nationally.
Human trafficking is a crime against the person because of the violation of the victim’s rights of movement through coercion and because of their commercial exploitation. Human trafficking is the trade in people, especially women and children, and does not necessarily involve the movement of the person from one place to another.
People smuggling (also called human smuggling and migrant smuggling) is a related practice which is characterized by the consent of the person being smuggled.  Smuggling situations can descend into human trafficking through coercion and exploitation. Trafficked people are held against their will through acts of coercion, and forced to work for or provide services to the trafficker or others.
According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), forced labour alone (one component of human trafficking) generates an estimated $150 billion in profits per annum as of 2014.  In 2012, the ILO estimated that 21 million victims are trapped in modern-day slavery. Of these, 14.2 million (68%) were exploited for labour, 4.5 million (22%) were sexually exploited, and 2.2 million (10%) were exploited in state-imposed forced labour.
The International Labour Organization has reported that child workers, minorities, and irregular migrants are at considerable risk of more extreme forms of exploitation. Statistics shows that over half of the world’s 215 million young workers are observed to be in hazardous sectors, including forced sex work and forced street begging. Ethnic minorities and highly marginalized groups of people are highly estimated to work in some of the most exploitative and damaging sectors, such as leather tanning, mining, and stone quarry work.
Human trafficking is the third largest crime industry in the world, behind drug dealing and arms trafficking, and is the fastest-growing activity of trans-national criminal organizations.
Human trafficking is condemned as a violation of human rights by international conventions. In addition, human trafficking is subject to a directive in the European Union. According to a report by the U.S. State Department, Belarus, Iran, Russia, and Turkmenistan remain among the worst countries when it comes to providing protection against human trafficking and forced labour.
Human trafficking is a global, complex, and heartbreaking issue. For approximately 40 million people, it’s not some obscure, disconnected concept that’s hard to comprehend; it’s a reality they’re forced to live in daily.
If we want to effectively contribute to the eradication of modern slavery, we must first understand what causes it and how it affects those involved. Only then can we start making strategic moves to stop human trafficking and truly help those in need.

THE ROOT CAUSE OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING IS TRAFFICKERS.

Traffickers prey on others’ weaknesses, unfortunate circumstances, unfamiliarity, and inexperience. Traffickers are trained to identify vulnerability and use expert manipulation tactics to persuade and control their victims. They identify a void and offer to fill it.

 

VULNERABILITY CREATES OPPORTUNITY FOR TRAFFICKERS.
Individuals living in difficult conditions can become desperate, and that desperation makes them vulnerable. While the following categories do not cause human trafficking, they do create a state of vulnerability and ideal opportunities for traffickers to strike.

 

Conditions That Create Vulnerability

 

POVERTY
When someone living in poverty, such as a widow or single mother who struggles to provide for her children, is desperate to meet a basic need, she is in a vulnerable position. A trafficker, familiar with this scenario, might offer her a job that enables her to feed her children. If this appears to be her only option, she may accept and be willing to do whatever the trafficker asks of her.

UNEMPLOYMENT
Traffickers target unemployed individuals and often use deception to persuade them to leave home and take a job in another city or country. The position may initially sound promising, but once the individual arrives at the destination, it is often much different than what was described. To keep them from leaving, traffickers may confiscate their victims’ passports or IDs. They might also pay for transportation, shelter, clothing, or food so their victims are indebted to them and feel obligated to work.

 

DISPLACEMENT
War, political instability, and natural disasters can displace individuals or entire families. When people are forced to flee their homes and communities, they can experience financial hardship, homelessness, and culture shock. Children who have lost their parents, for example, are easy targets for traffickers. Without a safe place to call home or a guardian to provide for and protect them, these children become vulnerable to abuse, unfair treatment, and trafficking.

 

LACK OF KNOWLEDGE OR EXPERIENCE
Inexperience may lead individuals down a path that ends in exploitation. A teenager who is approached by a trafficker may accept an attractive job offer, seeing it as a great opportunity at such a young age. An immigrant who arrives in a foreign country may not understand his or her rights, may be unfamiliar with the nation’s laws, or may not know the national language. A trafficker will quickly take advantage of these types of situations.

 

BROKEN FAMILIES
Individuals who are cast out of their homes, abandoned, or placed into the child welfare system are highly vulnerable to human trafficking. Runaways, youth experiencing homelessness, and those who live in isolation are often targeted. When someone feels alone or unloved or has been abused in the past, they may be willing to take great risks. They may feel as though they have little to lose or may even find comfort living with their trafficker. Some traffickers offer love and acceptance to lure individuals to work for them.

CULTURAL PRACTICES
In some societies, it’s widely accepted to devalue and abuse women and children. This outlook is ingrained into the minds of men and women in certain cultures, which creates a huge opportunity for traffickers. A parent may be willing to sell a daughter and send her into a world of exploitation. Some girls and women may leave home willingly if they’ve been raised to believe they are unequal to men or have few opportunities for work and advancement in their own communities. In traditional cultures where arranged marriages are common, girls are sometimes forced into child marriage, which can also be identified as a form of human trafficking.
Human trafficking can have physical, emotional, and psychological effects on anyone involved. It has the power to impact someone’s life forever. Here are some common ways human trafficking affects victims and perpetrators. As you read through this section, keep in mind that many traffickers also experience trauma because of what they see and do to others, and many traffickers have been victimized themselves at some point in their lives.

 

FOR THE VICTIMS

 

MENTAL TRAUMA
The U.S. Department of State explains, “Because traffickers dehumanize and objectify their victims, victims’ innate sense of power, visibility, and dignity often become obscured.”
Victims of human trafficking can experience devastating psychological effects during and after their trafficking experience. Many survivors may end up experiencing post-traumatic stress, difficulty in relationships, depression, memory loss, anxiety, fear, guilt, shame, and other severe forms of mental trauma.

 

PHYSICAL TRAUMA
Many victims also experience physical injuries. Those who have been sexually exploited are often abused by their traffickers and customers. They may be raped, beaten, and subjected to abuse over a long period of time. There is also a higher risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, infections, diabetes, cancer, and other illnesses. A lack of proper medical care allows these conditions to spread and worsen—often affecting an individual’s health permanently.
Victims of forced labor may work in dangerous conditions for long hours doing repetitive tasks. They may also be exposed to dangerous contaminants or work with heavy equipment. As a result, many are subjected to serious infections, respiratory problems, injuries, impairments, and exhaustion.
OSTRACISM
Individuals who are being trafficked can quickly become isolated from friends, family, and other social circles. This may be due to their personal feelings of guilt and shame or because they’ve relocated and now live far away from their community. Either way, victims can become isolated, withdrawn, and lose contact with most people.
Some individuals who return home or escape a trafficking situation may even be excluded from social groups due to a stigma they now face; they may be shunned by their family and friends and feel unloved and unwanted. Unfortunately, this isolation can make them vulnerable to being trafficked again or lead them to return to an abusive lifestyle.

 

LACK OF INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS
Many victims who escape a trafficking situation lack advanced education and the resources needed to live independently. They may not understand laws in the country where they now reside or may not speak the language. They may have been trafficked at a young age and were unable to attend school or go to college. After being confined to the same job for a long period of time and not being allowed to learn new skills, victims can become dependent. When the time comes, they may have a hard time living on their own.

 

FOR THE TRAFFICKERS

 

MONEY
Human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal industry in the world, second in size only to drug trafficking. Traffickers generate $150 billion per year, according to the International Labor Organization. $99 billion of that is generated through sex trafficking alone, while the other $51 billion is generated through labor trafficking. The more traffickers participate in the exploitation of others, the more money they make for themselves.
CHEAP LABOUR
Traffickers use deception to attract employees to work for them. They may promise a safe working environment and fair pay. In reality, employees are often forced to work long, hard hours for little or no pay. By using threats or violence, employers can convince their employees to continue working for them and to keep quiet.

 

ESCAPE FROM VICTIMIZATION
Once victims age out of their current positions, they may be offered a job as a trafficker. Some accept the new position to escape their own victimization. They then begin exploiting others.

 

Human trafficking continues to grow in staggering numbers around the world. The effects of this injustice are far reaching, impacting all individuals involved, their communities, and generations that follow. While the causes and effects are varied and multifaceted, sustainable change can happen if survivors are rescued and their perpetrators are arrested. The more dangerous human trafficking becomes for traffickers, the less likely they will continue exploiting others.